Functional Advertising

In class last year we spent some time learning about advertising and to try to think of a time, place, day where you haven’t been exposed (or even inundated) with advertising seems practically impossible from project placement, billboards, commercials, clothing, the products you buy and consume – its everywhere.

If advertising is going to be so prominent in everyones lives, why not make it more functional? Why not have advertising serve a greater purpose or provide a service?

In Peru, that exact question is being answered: researchers have developed a billboard that will provide clean, potable, drinking water to anyone who wants it for free. This billboard is taking advantage of the 98% humidity in the areas outside of Lima that have little to no rain during many parts of the year (conditions common in many tropical areas) and captures condensation. If this kind of technology can (and has been) developed for conditions of high humidity, why not find a way to develop other services as well? Perhaps advertising space could come at a lower premium if it serves a greater purpose.

What better way to promote your product or company than by already showing how you can meet a need?

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Post 2015: What’s next for International Development?

If you’re passionate about international development or anything that can loosely fall under this category than you have most heard of the Millennium Development Goals, if you have no clue what the MDGs are or want to learn more about them please click here.

What I’m particularly interested in is what happens after 2015? We all know that the MDGs won’t be entirely successful; in fact the most recent indicates that none of the goals will be universally successful across all geographic regions. Now this shouldn’t take away from the successes of the MDGs, but it demonstrates that there is still a lot of work to be done, namely with regards to maternal health (least success across the board), gender equality and the empowerment of women, and universal primary education. These goals had some of the least success (apart from equal girls’ enrolment in primary school) and in some instances actually showed a decline. In addition to this, there are worrying trends with regards to poverty and hunger and environmental sustainability as we continue to cycle through periods of extremely volatile food prices leading to higher populations that are food insecurity and with the rapid rates of population growth and urban sprawl it is incredible difficult to promote and maintain sustainable environmental practices.

All this being said, what’s going to happen in three years and sixty-six days when the MDGs expire?

There are two suggestions that have a significant amount of overlap: the Bellagio Goals and the Sustainability Goals. Now for some background information:

The Sustainability Goals suggestion came out of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) in June, 2012 by Colombia, Guatemala and Peru. The SDGs look to combine goals on economic growth, social equality, and environmental sustainability into a concise goals and indicators for development. The SDGs have broad goals which cut across manner factors and include: poverty eradication, environmental sustainability, and sustainable consumption and production. These goals could be achieved through many dimensions, themes, approaches, and priority areas and will be threatened by many challenges. The SDGs have received criticism due to their similarities to the MDGs as many people believe that they neglect developed countries, maintain ‘donor-driven’ programs, and fail to consider actual needs of developing countries.

The Bellagio Goals came out of a post Rio+20 conference in Bellagio, Italy that discussed some of the principles from the SDGs. The Bellagio Goals are somewhat more inclusive (yet still not firmly determined) and include Inclusive Growth, Food and Water, Education and Skills, Health, Gender Equality, Environmental Sustainability, Resilient Communities, Infrastructure, Civil and Political Rights, and Global Governance. These goals would be applicable to developed and developing countries and would involve global targets, regional targets, and national targets; instead of being determined globally, national targets would be determined by the nation to which they apply based on a pre-determined minimum level. The indicators would also be determined nationally and regionally which allows for increased ownership and more applicable aims and results. These goals are intended to be multidisciplinary with actions overlapping multiple goals – this will help to distribute funding and work and develop a more sustainable approach overall.

What do you think? Are these types of goals the answer? Is it possible to develop global goals or are national approaches better? Do you agree that ‘developed’ nations should have targets and be held to a standard?

Where should women live?

I’ve recently made a twitter account and I have to say I’m learning to love the way information is shared on it. I find that I’m able to scan and see way more data than I ever would have otherwise. Knowing my passion for gender equality and rights, I’m sure its not surprising that I focused on these topics. I came across this infographic and I have to say that I was a little bit startled to see some of the ratios and data regarding gender equality. Canada is currently ranked 17th among the best/worst places to be a woman, and that indicates a fall of 3 places from the last time these indicators were compared. What is most interesting, is that much of Canada’s failures regarding women’s rights and gender equality can be directly correlated to their relations with the Aboriginal population. Check it out, and tell me what you think.

Rio 20+ Progress after 20 years, or still moving in circles?

As the Rio 20+ conference is set to begin, it will be interesting to see how it progresses and how sustainability has developed as a key item on the global agenda. The two main focus areas for Rio 20+ are a ‘green economy in the context of sustainable development poverty eradication and the institutional framework for sustainable development.”

While these are great focal areas, the conference seems to lack the force necessary to guarantee and police commitments. Developed nations have been notorious for regressing and failing to meet the commitments, promises, and goals set out and there is little to show that this conference will be any different. Prior to the beginning of the discussions, only 37% of the draft agreement had been agreed to, with the refusals and changes made primarily by developed nations.

Nations are still wrapped up in the debate as to whether food, water, and sanitation should be considered universal rights (despite their inclusion in the millennium development goals). Come on Canada! Water is necessary for survival, so as a basic need, shouldn’t it be protected?

What is also fascinating is that all nations participating recognize that 30-100 billion dollars are needed to meet the current and prior commitments to sustainability, but none can agree as to where these funds should come from. So, everyone knows that something needs to be done, but none are willing to contribute in order to make it happen.

Talks begin on Wednesday, I’m curious to see what happens. But in the mean time, what do you think? How will the conference turn out? Will commitments be made or reaffirmed? Will we leave feeling hopeful?

Millennium Development Goals (again)

 Water

There are news articles everywhere saying we’ve met the MDG target for access to clean, drinkable water and technically we have. We have halved the percent of population without access to clean water, with 2 billion additional people having access. But are we done yet?

While it is incredible that 89% of the population has access to clean, drinkable water (comparable to 76% in 1990), that means that 11% of the population is still forced to drink unsafe, unclean water every single day, 40% of which is in Sub-Saharan Africa. So are we done yet? Absolutely not, but at least progress is being made.

On another note, lets take a peak at the goal for maternal mortality.

Under this goal the UN is hoping to reduce maternal mortality by three quarters and ensure universal access to reproductive health. Now it is often said that these two indicators are often the best clue into the status of women’s rights and gender equality in a particular country. Some progress has been made, but this goal has seen the least progress and in many cases the least effort.

While nations around the world are making significant efforts to improve women’s rights, access to reproductive health (contraception, information, and abortion), increasing access to trained professionals prior to, during, and after birth, and increasing education and knowledge in general, we have countries closer to home where access to reproductive health (contraception, information, and abortion) is still considered fair game for public debate.

From 1998-2010 the USA actually regressed in terms of their maternal mortality rate showing an increase of twenty-five percent in a twelve-year period. Its appalling that such a thing can happen in a nation with health care readily available, and it demonstrates that gender equality and women’s health was not at the forefront of the nation’s agenda.

In Canada, we have the pesky little issue of abortion. Abortion is legal (huge win for women’s rights), but not available throughout the entire nation where some provinces and regions do not have the tools or facilities to perform abortions forcing Canadians to travel huge distances to seek out medical care. This drastically increases the cost, and decreases the availability of such reproductive health to girls and women who may not be able to travel and/or live in rural regions. Even more appalling is that we still have elected officials who are trying to make abortion illegal-may I add that I have yet to ever hear or see a female MP in Canada try to overturn our current abortion law? An MP from Kitchener has been trying to bring the abortion debate back into parliament since Christmas of 2011.

Does that mean that women’s rights are regressing? Maybe, but with absolute certainty it means that every nations must make a firm commitment to improve women’s rights, health, and access.

To check out international progress on the MDG’s go here.